Curriculum and Assessment Overview

Combining real-world projects with intellectual rigor, the Honors College at Southern Oregon University aims to provide a challenging learning environment. Our creative curricula will take advantage of the university’s unique location by drawing on the rich natural, cultural, and artistic resources that are Southern Oregon. Southern Oregon University seeks to create a community of learners prepared for a lifetime of intellectual curiosity, inquiry, scholarship, and service.

The Honors College curriculum comprises 50 credits of Honors College coursework that collectively satisfy SOU’s University Studies (general-education requirements). In order to graduate from the Honors College at Southern Oregon University, students must:

  • Maintain minimum grade point averages — This includes a 3.5 cumulative overall GPA.
  • Successfully complete all required Honors College courses — This equates to 50 total credits, which collectively satisfy all general education requirements, and count toward the 180 credits required to graduate. Successfully complete a minimum of one Honors College course per academic year is required.
  • Successfully complete the mentor/internship sequence — Successfully complete one substantive supplemental educational experience, which can include community partner mentoring, an internship, practicum, student teaching, service-learning project, study abroad, or National Student Exchange experience.  This is to be undertaken with the advice and guidance of the Honors College Director
  • Participate in all required Honors College co-curricular activities — Students are required to attend all "Essential Events," which are designated in advance as required or mandatory. Freshmen must attend four "Pick and Choose Activities" each term and submit a one-page analytical synopsis at the end of each quarter. Sophomores must attend three "Pick and Choose Activities" per term, and none is required for juniors and seniors. In addition, each Honors College Scholar must successfully complete two "Take the Lead Projects" in his or her four years at SOU. These are considered by the SOU Registrar as degree requirements for Honors College students. To satisfy their "Take the Lead Project," SOU Honors College students must submit a satisfactory proposal to the Honors College Director that addresses the following questions or prompts:
    • Describe generally, what you are thinking.
    • Who will participate in the project?
    • Does it address a need or problem? If so, what is it?
    • What is your motivation to undertake this project?
    • What are the goals for the project?
    • What is the name of the project?
    • How does the project align to the university mission?
    • Is there any initiative similar to this project untaken previously or concurrently?
    • Who determines the organization, strategy, and tasks for the project, and what are those tasks?
    • What is the timeline, from implementation to conclusion, for the project?
    • What resources, financial or otherwise, are required to make the project successful?
    • What opportunities are there for partnerships, and who are partners at the university or in the community who might be willing to collaborate on the project?
    • Which organizational authorities need to approve the project in order to make it successful?
    • By what assessment matrix or evaluation criteria will the project be considered successful?
    • If it is successful, what ensures its perpetuation beyond the current individuals involved, or should it be continued?
    • Do you understand there needs to be a reflection submitted in writing (two pages single spaced minimum) after the project is completed that discusses who benefitted from the project, what impact it had, what went well, and what could have been done better?
    • All Honors College students sign a Certificate of Intent before starting their course of studies, in which they acknowledge an understanding of the Honors College curriculum, and their satisfactory completion of all requirements before graduation from Southern Oregon University.

FIRST YEAR CURRICULUM

HON 101: Honors Foundations (4 credits)

Required of all freshman Honors College students in the fall term, students will demonstrate proficiency in critical reading, analysis, and discussion. They will:

  • Identify a subject, purpose, thesis, supporting points, evidence, assumptions, and conclusions in a text;
  • Craft a thesis claim;
  • Demonstrate that he or she can tailor an essay to fit one’s audience and intent;
  • Overcome writer’s block through exercises like free-writing and clustering ideas;
  • Write paragraphs that have unity, development, and coherence;
  • Show attentiveness to sentence-level choices, so that writing has vigor, precision, economy, and flair, and design effective beginnings and endings.

Open only to Honors College students.

HON 102: Honors Foundations (4 credits)

Required of all freshman Honors College students in the winter term, students will:

  • Demonstrate an ability to choose a general subject;
  • Compile a working bibliography;
  • Limit areas of research;
  • Formulate a tentative thesis and restate it;
  • Master careful reading and taking notes, the arts of summary, paraphrase, and quotation;
  • Master the craft of preparing an outline and writing a first draft;
  • Demonstrate an ability to identify logical fallacies and document sources;
  • Revise work and write a final draft.

Prerequisite: HON 101

Open only to Honors College students.

HON 103: Honors Foundations (4 credits)

Required of all freshman Honors students in the spring term, students will demonstrate continued practice of critical-thinking skills covered in HON 101 and HON 102 through continued discussion of class readings. Students will also:

  • Show evidence of information literacy through library research;
  • Demonstrate a sharpening judgment of legitimate sources;
  • Demonstrate an ability to improve writing skills and revise work;
  • Implement strategies of sharpening a thesis and developing a coherent an essay;
  • Exhibit time-management skills;
  • Work collaboratively in small groups;
  • Speak publicly through classroom presentations;
  • Exhibit creativity by adapting a project from one medium to another.

Prerequisite: HON 102

Open only to Honors College students.

HON 243: Probability & Statistics (4 credits)

Required of all freshman Honors College students in the spring term, this course integrates basic concepts of probability and statistics. Topics from probability will include Venn diagrams, independence, mutually exclusive, conditional probability, and counting techniques such as permutations, combinations, and sampling with or without replacement. Students will learn techniques for describing data both graphically and numerically and will explore inferential statistical concepts such as the Normal distribution, regression, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and p-values. This course is open only to Honors College students and satisfies University Strand D (Quantitative Reasoning): Effectively formulate and use mathematical models and procedures to address abstract and applied problems. Prerequisites: MTH 95 or an appropriate SOU placement level, and enrollment in the Honors College.

SECOND AND THIRD YEAR CURRICULUM

HON 209: Practicum / Internship (1-8 credits)

Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits.

HON 250: Logic and Lines of Argumentation (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the fall term of their sophomore year, this is the first in a three-term sequence that introduces and develops skills for constructing arguments, including both deductive and inductive. It examines a variety of samples from various disciplines as models for reasoning as well as learning to distinguish between opinion, belief, fact, and knowledge.

HON 251: Fallacies in Arguments (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the winter term of their sophomore year, this is the second in the three-term sequence known as “Modes of Argumentation,” and develops skills for recognizing fallacies or errors in reasoning. It examines fallacies in several categories: Relevance, Weak Induction, Presumption, and Ambiguity.

HON 252: Varieties of Reasoning (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the spring term of their sophomore year, this is the third in the three-term sophomore-seminars sequence and explores varieties of argumentation employed in different areas of human experience. It covers arguments made in science, law, politics, religion, as well as in moral and philosophical settings. Through careful reading and textual analysis, Socratic dialogues and writing exercises, the seminar prepares students to identify and distinguish between argument types and their purposes.

HON 299: Special Studies (1-8 credits)

Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for different content for a maximum of 16 credits.

HON 301: Leadership: Historical and Contemporary Figures (4 credits)

Required of all Honors College students with sophomore standing or higher, this course requires students to consider numerous forms of leadership, and critically evaluate the leadership styles and contributions of various historical and contemporary figures.

HON 315: Art, Culture, and Humanities (4 credits)

Required of all Honors College students with sophomore standing or higher. Students will examine the concepts and works of select philosophers, artists, and historians whose ideas have been central to the ways in which societies have expressed and interpreted art. Students will explore various approaches to aesthetics (the philosophy and theory of “beauty” and “art”), and discuss what influences and values these have for society. A multi-disciplinary approach to the theory, meaning, and production of art will be used.

HON 317: Politics, Institutions, and Society (4 credits)

Required of all Honors College students with sophomore standing or higher. Students will explore the normative complexities involved in the interplay between individuals, institutions, and public policy in modern democracies. They will examine these topics by analyzing some of the most challenging contemporary issues, such as climate change, stem cell research, hunger, access to healthcare, education, legal justice, and human rights. Ethical, social, and political implications for citizens in the context of a civil society will be discussed.

HON 319: Science, Sustainability, and Nature (4 credits)

Required of all Honors College students with sophomore standing or higher. Critical issues facing society that relate to science, nature, or sustainability will be examined. Issues will be explored from scientific, historical, cultural, economic, and social perspectives. Students will analyze nature, origins, and ethical concerns of selected problems and conflicts.

JUNIOR SEMINARS — MODES OF INQUIRY

HON 350: Qualitative and Historical Inquiry (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the fall term of their junior year, this is the first in a three-term sequence of courses known collectively as the “Junior Seminars: Modes of Inquiry.” It introduces students to the methodology of social-scientific research. Students learn how to evaluate social research, and how social scientists gather and analyze data. Students will explore the strengths and weaknesses of using “the scientific method” as a means of producing knowledge about the social world. Topics explored include study design, sampling, measurement, causality, and the political and ethical issues involved in research.

HON 351: Descriptive and Correlational Inquiry (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the winter term of their junior year, this seminar explores the descriptive and correlational aspects of quantitative research. Through descriptive research, they will examine data and analyze statistics related to phenomena, one variable at a time. Building on univariate analysis, students will learn to apply correlational statistical techniques and investigate relations among multiple variables. Through correlational research, students investigate a range of factors, including the nature of the relationship between two or more variables, and the theoretical model that might be developed and tested to explain these resultant correlations. Students examine the degree of strength to which causal inferences can be made using these forms of inquiry.

HON 352: Experimental Inquiry (1 credit)

Taken by Honors College students in the spring term of their junior year, this seminar uses selected examples from fields of natural science to introduce and analyze the process of scientific discovery. Using case studies, students assess the application of scientific method, generation of hypothesis, data collection, experiment design, the drawing of conclusions, and how scientific inquiry informs a society’s understanding of knowledge and nature. Elements in scientific research, such as technology, aesthetics, intuition, and serendipity are discussed.

HON 399: Special Studies (1-8 credits)

Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for different content for a maximum of 16 credits.

HON 409: Practicum / Internship (1-8 credits)

Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits.

HON 490: Honors College Capstone (4 credits)

Required of all Honors College students, this course provides students with an opportunity to integrate and apply the concepts and techniques they have learned during the course of their studies at Southern Oregon University. In accordance with the SOU Honors College Capstone Guidelines, each student creates and produces a "Capstone Project," which must be an intensive product of the student's independent work, and must be completed under the guidance of the Honors College Director and an SOU faculty member who serves as the Project Supervisor. Consisting of both a written product, and a presentation of the student’s research in a public academic forum, the Capstone Project must focus on a research problem, theoretical issue, new creative work, or innovative area of application, preferably addressing a regional topic that has national or international implications. While striving to make an original scholarly contribution to their academic disciplines, students are encouraged to complete a Capstone Project that will simultaneously fulfill requirements for their major.

The Honors College curriculum comprises 50 credits of Honors College coursework, which all Honors College students must successfully complete, earning a grade of at least a C or better. These 50 credits count toward the 180 credits required to graduate from SOU. Students must meet all applicable curricular requirements listed below with a 3.5 GPA or better (term and cumulative), maintain a 3.25 GPA in all Honors College coursework (term and cumulative), participate fully in various required co-curricular activities and events, and participate in the Community Partner Mentor Program / Internship / Study Abroad Sequence.

Freshman Courses
Course
Title
Credits
HON 101
Honors Foundations
4
HON 102
Honors Foundations
4
HON 103
Honors Foundations
4
HON 243
Probability and Statistics
4
Sophomore Seminars (Modes of Argumentation)
Course
Title
Credits
HON 250
Seminar: Logic and Lines of Argumentation
1
HON 251
Seminar: Fallacies in Arguments
1
r: Varieties of Reasoning
1
Junior Seminars (Modes of Inquiry)
Course
Title
Credits
HON 350
Seminar: Qualitative / Historical Modes of Inquiry
1
HON 351
Seminar: Descriptive / Correlational Modes of Inquiry
1
HON 352
Seminar: Experimental Modes of Inquiry
1
Other Required Courses
Course
Title
Credits
HON 301
Leadership: Historical and Contemporary Figures
4
Any five courses in the 315-317-319 sequence, with all three taken at least once. Various topics will be offered under these subject numbers, so two of the courses will be repeated, but will have a different focus and different subtitle — 20 credits total
HON 315
Art, Culture, and Humanities
4
HON 317
Politics, Institutions, and Society
4
HON 319
Science, Sustainability, and Nature
4
HON 490
Honors College Capstone
4
TOTAL 50

The required curriculum for all students in the Honors College at Southern Oregon University (SOU) consists of ten "strands," labeled A through J, which are divided into three sets, "Foundation," "Exploration," and "Integration." Each strand has three or four supporting learning goals, which are comprised of both knowledge goals and skill goals. Traditionally at SOU, the foundation and exploration strands have been assessed in lower-level courses (designated 100-299), and the integration strands have been assessed in upper-level courses (designated 300-499). While the Honors College retains these divisions of foundation, exploration, and integration strands, assessments are not constrained in the Honors College by designated course numbers. Exploration strands, for example, may be assessed in upper-level courses.

Students demonstrate proficiency of the learning goals, and hence the strands themselves, through successfully passing proficiency assessments in various required courses that align to the learning goals. Proficiency assessments are based on rubrics that are divided into quintiles (A, B, C, D, F) corresponding to the decade-percentile system. Both course assessments and grades follow this pattern.

    100-94%
    A
  •   93-90%
    A-
  •   89-87%
    B+
  •   86-84%
    B
  •   83-80%
    B-
  •   79-77%
    C+
  •   76-74%
    C
  •   73-70%
    C-
  •   69-67%
    D+
  •   66-64%
    D
  •   63-60%
    D-
  •   59% or lower
    F

Proficiency of each learning goal (knowledge or skill) is determined if 87.5% of the Honors College Scholars "meet expectation" on the corresponding assessments and/or in the grades of corresponding Honors College courses. This is significantly higher than the SOU University Studies standard of success and distinguishes the Honors College as an academically rigorous program. As rationale, Honors College Scholars are required to maintain a 3.25-grade point average in all Honors College courses (term and cumulative), which equates to 87.5%, and inherently indicates success if students remain in good standing in the Honors College and graduate from SOU with an Honors College Degree. For assessment purposes, the Honors College learning goals the scale will simply be:

    0 = Failed to meet the expectation
  • 1 = Met expectation

The Honors College will be considered successful in terms of "strand proficiency" if at least 87.5% of the learning goals (knowledge and skills) "meet expectation." To follow best practices and continuous improvement, data will be kept on assessments and course grades that correspond to learning goals and strands. Data will be aggregated and de-aggregated according to assessment, course, learning goal, strand, student, cohort, and program.

SOU Honors College Learning Outcomes (Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions) at a Glance:

  • Knowledge Outcome 1: Writing and Oral Communication (Strand A)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to communicate effectively using writing, speech, and image.
  • Knowledge Outcome 2: Writing and Oral Communication (Strand B)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to be able to conceptualize ideas holistically, logically, and creatively.
  • Knowledge Outcome 3: Writing and Oral Communication (Strand C)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to access and use information resources effectively and ethically.
  • Knowledge Outcome 4: Quantitative Reasoning (Strand D)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to effectively formulate and use mathematical models and procedures to address abstract and applied problems.
  • Knowledge Outcome 5: Humanities / Arts and Letters (Strand E)

Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to recognize human accomplishments in the creative and performing arts and understand the role of the humanities in clarifying

individual and social values.

  • Knowledge Outcome 6: Social Science (Strand F)

Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to understand the fundamental concepts of social science and the interconnections among social institutions, values, individuals, and Groups.

  • Knowledge Outcome 7: Science (Physical and Biological) (Strand G)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to understand the fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of the Natural Sciences and their impact on human experience.
  • Knowledge Outcome 8: Science, Technology, and Society (Strand H)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to understand the interactions of science, technology, and human affairs.
  • Knowledge Outcome 9: Citizenship and Social Responsibility (Strand I)
    Students will demonstrate the knowledge required to understand and apply moral standards to individual conduct and citizenship through ethical inquiry.
  • Knowledge Outcome 10: Diversity and Global Awareness (Strand J)
    Students will demonstrate knowledge required to understand institutions, assumptions, and values from national and global perspectives.
  • Skill Goal 1 - Communication: Students will demonstrate the ability to use English language conventions accurately to construct coherent written and oral arguments.
  • Skill Goal 2 - Multiple Mode Learning and Academic Integrity: Students will demonstrate the ability to work individually and collaboratively while practicing academic honesty and maintaining academic integrity.
  • Skill Goal 3 - Information Investigation and Assessment: Students will demonstrate the ability to investigate and assess information, using evidence-based reasoning and critical thinking, to develop knowledge.
  • Skill Goal 4 - Information Interpretation, Analysis, and Integration: Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret, analyze, and integrate complex information and connect theory and practice to draw new and perceptive conclusions.
  • Skill Goal 5 - Questioning: Students will demonstrate an ability to formulate questions that reveal an intelligent curiosity about ideas and concepts.
  • Skill Goal 6 - Research: Students will demonstrate the ability to evaluate and synthesize information from multiple sources, and various perspectives, to strategically transform information into meaningful knowledge to explain or solve complex issues.
  • Disposition 1 - Leadership: Through curricular and co-curricular activities students will strive to understand characteristics and forms of leadership and to exhibit leadership in various settings. These include, but are not limited to, academics, civic engagement, community service, and environmental responsibility.

The Ten SOU Strands are:
Strand A: Communication
Strand B: Thinking
Strand C: Information Literacy
Strand D: Quantitative Reasoning

Strand E: Humanities
Strand F: Social Science
Strand G: Science – Physical, Biological, and Computer

Strand H: Science, Technology, and Society
Strand I: Citizenship and Social Responsibility
Strand J: Diversity & Global Awareness

FOUNDATION STRANDS
Strand A. Communication Goals — Communicate effectively using writing, speech, and image.
Assessed in HON 101, HON 102, HON 103, and HON 490

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use Standard American English.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Use standard conventions of grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and spelling.
    2. Structure sentences in varied and appropriate ways.
    3. Use vocabulary and phrasing appropriate to purpose and audience.
  2. Identify perceptions, assumptions, and biases in any point of view.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Distinguish between critical thought and subjective reaction.
    2. Assess claims and conclusions in relation to points of view.
    3. Evaluate inferences in thought.
  3. Apply logical thought to theoretical and practical issues.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Summarize an argument's main claim(s) and conclusion(s).
    2. Analyze and evaluate an argument's logic, evidence, and efficacy.
    3. Weigh evidence to determine accuracy, relevance, and sufficiency.
    4. Assess implications and consequences of ideas.
    5. Produce effective arguments using claims, evidence, and valid inferences.
  4. Creatively shape ideas, evidence, and experiences.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Use ideas to structure and solve problems.
    2. Frame decisions using sound interpretations, findings, and solutions.
    3. Effectively create a course of action or communicate a point of view.

Strand B. Thinking Goals — Conceptualize ideas holistically, logically, and creatively. Assessed in HON 101, HON 102, HON 103, and HON 490

  1. Demonstrate awareness of multiple perspectives.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Understand how thinking relates to historical and cultural contexts.
    2. Articulate the salient points of any idea.
    3. Identify the questions at issue.
  2. Identify perceptions, assumptions, and biases in any point of view.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Distinguish between critical thought and subjective reaction.
    2. Assess claims and conclusions in relation to points of view.
    3. Evaluate inferences in thought.
  3. Apply logical thought to theoretical and practical issues.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Summarize an argument’s main claim(s) and conclusion(s).
    2. Analyze and evaluate an argument’s logic, evidence, and efficacy.
    3. Weigh evidence to determine accuracy, relevance, and sufficiency.
    4. Assess implications and consequences of ideas.
    5. Produce effective arguments using claims, evidence, and valid inferences.
  4. Creatively shape ideas, evidence, and experiences.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Use ideas to structure and solve problems.
    2. Frame decisions using sound interpretations, findings, and solutions.
    3. Effectively create a course of action or communicate a point of view.

Strand C. Information Literacy — Access and use information resources effectively and ethically.
Assessed in HON 101, HON 102, HON 103, and HON 490

  1. Determine the nature and extent of information needed.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Develop and refine research questions.
    2. Identify key concepts and terms required to locate information.
    3. Examine and assess potential resources specific to research purpose.
  2. Access information effectively and efficiently.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Differentiate among keywords, subject headings, and descriptors.
    2. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.
    3. Implement a variety of information search strategies.
    4. Use a full array of library services to retrieve information.
  3. Evaluate information and resources.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Determine the accuracy of information by questioning the source of data.
    2. Analyze the limitations of information gathering tools or strategies.
    3. Investigate differing viewpoints in the information.
  4. Integrate information ethically and legally.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Retrieve and manipulate information across contexts and in multiple formats.
    2. Understand intellectual property, copyright, and fair use of information.
    3. Cite sources using an appropriate documentation style, without plagiarism or misrepresentation.

Strand D. Quantitative Reasoning — Effectively formulate and use mathematical models and procedures to address abstract and applied problems.
Assessed in HON 243

  1. Recognize and express relationships using quantitative symbols.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Translate real-world phenomena into algebraic expressions that correctly reflect quantitative relationships among variables.
    2. Know the four forms of quantitative symbols: given numbers, unknown constants, parameters (unknown numbers fixed by an applied context), and variables (unknown numbers that vary within an applied context) and use them appropriately.
    3. Apply fundamental mathematical models to a variety of academic contexts.
  2. Interpret, evaluate, and manipulate quantitative representations appropriately.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Know the important features of various quantitative models (algebraic, graphical, numeric, tables, charts, verbal).
    2. Use various quantitative models to analyze phenomena.
    3. Choose critically among quantitative models to efficiently discover relevant conclusions.
  3. Communicate quantitative concepts and relationships in plain language.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Reason inductively in a quantitative context by imagining, testing, and communicating general relationships from patterns.
    2. Reason deductively in a quantitative context by identifying mathematical premises, inferred conclusions, and errors in reasoning.
    3. Translate and communicate quantitative results in real-world contexts.

EXPLORATION STRANDS
SOU defines study in the arts and humanities as focusing on intellectual and cultural expression approached through historical, cultural, and aesthetic investigations and interpretations.

Strand E. Humanities — Recognize human accomplishments in the arts and humanities and understand their role in clarifying individual and social values.
Assessed in HON 315

  1. Understand basic formal elements, principles, and composition structures in written, oral, visual, or performed texts, works, and/or artifacts.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Describe how technical, organizational, and aesthetic elements in human expression reflect ideas and emotions.
    2. Classify and compare intellectual and artistic endeavors according to recognized criteria and genres.
    3. Understand how differences in form affect meaning.
  2. Understand how cultural and historical factors impact the creation of written, oral, visual, or performed texts, works, and/or artifacts.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Compare works from different time periods and cultures.
    2. Demonstrate how cultural and historical forces influence a creative process.
    3. Analyze individuals' creative processes within a specific art and/or discipline.
  3. Understand how the reception of texts, works, and/or artifacts influences individuals, cultures, and societies.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Explain how individuals respond differently to intellectual and artistic endeavors.
    2. Recognize and explain how intellectual and artistic endeavors influence cultural and societal assumptions and values.
    3. Recognize and explain how intellectual and artistic endeavors change culture and society.

The Honors College at SOU defines Social Science as those disciplines that examine how individuals, groups, institutions, and societies behave and interact with one another and their environments. They provide students with the tools to analyze social, political, or economic institutions (such as families, communities, or governments), and to examine societal issues and problems at individual, cultural, national, or global levels.

Strand F. Social Science — Understand fundamental concepts of social science and the interconnections among social institutions, values, individuals, and groups.
Assessed in HON 317

  1. Understand connections between individuals and social, economic, and/or political institutions.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Identify the impact of social, economic, and/or political institutions on individuals.
    2. Analyze social, economic, and/or political institutions, using discipline-based contexts or approaches.
  2. Understand the interactions of and the relationships between natural and social environments and resources.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze reciprocal influences among political, economic, and/or social developments.
    2. Identify and evaluate the impact of one’s own actions in a societal context.
  3. Apply social science perspectives to past and contemporary issues.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze and evaluate past episodes using discipline-based methodologies.
    2. Analyze and evaluate contemporary issues and problems from social, economic, and/or political perspectives.

NOTE: The Honors College at SOU defines the sciences as those disciplines that focus on a systematized body of knowledge derived through objective methodologies involving repeatable experimentation, observation, verification, and study. A lab class will include a practical laboratory component that accompanies lecture and course material. The Honors College at SOU defines a lab as a controlled setting where scientific experiments are performed.

Strand G. Sciences (Physical, Biological, and Computer) — Understand the fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of the sciences and their impacts on human experience.
Assessed in HON 319

  1. Understand major concepts, principles, and theories of the sciences.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Apply critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, and/or problem-solving skills to evaluate scientific evidence, theories, and hypotheses.
    2. Use language and concepts of a science discipline.
    3. Understand the broad historical outline of the development of the scientific worldview and important theories.
  2. Understand science as a means of learning about and understanding the natural world.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to generate and test scientific hypotheses by:
    1. Designing and carrying out experiments and systematic observational studies. In some cases, this may include a laboratory or field setting.
    2. Using appropriate tools to analyze results.
    3. Communicating results orally and in writing according to established standards of scientific communication, including appropriate use of tables, figures, and graphs.
  3. Apply scientific knowledge and methods to societal issues.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Inform decision-making on social, political, and/or economic issues.
    2. Explain the interrelationships between society and the sciences.
    3. Investigate impacts of technologies on segments of society and investigate plausible solutions to adverse impacts.

INTEGRATION STRANDS
Strand H. Science, Technology, and Society — Understand the interactions of science, technology, and human affairs.
Assessed in HON 317 or HON 319

  1. Understand how science as a way of knowing compares with non-scientific ways of knowing.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific explanations for phenomena.
    2. Compare and contrast methodologies used to compile evidence for constructing arguments and drawing conclusions.
  2. Make connections within the various fields of science and among science and Technology and other disciplines, including mathematics, social sciences, and humanities.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Explain how scientific knowledge and new technology relate.
    2. Identify the role of science in the development of literature, art, and/or music.
    3. Recognize the role of mathematics in the scientific process.
  3. Recognize ethical dilemmas in scientific processes, methods, and technological advancement.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze the consequences of technological and scientific change on the individual, society, and environment.
    2. Understand how scientific and technological solutions to societal problems conflict with belief systems and worldviews.
    3. Understand how science, technology, and non-scientific perspectives contribute to solutions of societal problems.

Strand I. Citizenship and Social Responsibility — Understand and apply moral standards to individual conduct and citizenship through ethical inquiry, social awareness, and civic engagement.
Assessed in HON 315, HON 317, or HON 319

  1. Understand and apply the tools necessary for responsible participation in communities.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of community issues, community assets, and community needs.
    2. Identify how individuals affect communities.
    3. Identify how communities affect individuals.
    4. Apply knowledge, information, and skills to community issues.
  2. Understand how ethical issues are embedded in citizenship and social responsibility.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Identify and analyze ethical problems or dilemmas.
    2. Articulate and acknowledge beliefs and assumptions as part of a value system.
    3. Describe own and others’ perceptions and ethical frameworks in decision making.
    4. Consider diverse choices, beliefs, and ethical frameworks in responding to ethical dilemmas.

Strand J. Diversity and Global Awareness — Understand institutions, assumptions, and values from national and global perspectives.
Assessed in HON 315 or 319

  1. Understand how one’s society is complex, contested, and dynamic.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Show how categories, ideologies, assumptions, and roles are culturally constructed and maintained.
    2. Identify power structures and explain their relationship to social class, race, gender and other systems of privilege and inequality.
    3. Explain the contributions of marginalized groups and how differences (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, class, religious affiliation) shape people's lives.
  2. Understand worldviews and cultural practices different from one's own.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze cultural meanings, beliefs, institutions and cultural practices in other societies according to one’s point of view.
    2. Identify patterns of cultural diversity in a particular region or country and understand how they developed.
    3. Assess attitudes and cultural practices inhibiting tolerance and cultural understanding.
  3. Understand how historical, economic, social, and political conditions affect cultural values and beliefs.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze how relations between values and conditions differ in various societies or groups.
    2. Explain the limits and potential of individuals in a particular setting.
    3. Describe how life experiences and situations influence the perception of self and others.
  4. Understand the dynamics of power in the world situation from global perspectives.
    Proficiencies: Students will be able to:
    1. Analyze the effects of power differences on specific peoples, societies, and cultural groups.
    2. Describe the development and impact of global institutions that transcend national economic, political, social and cultural jurisdiction.
    3. Explain how and why the term globalization is interpreted differently in different contexts.